Understand Social Security Disability

Usually, if you win your claim, you will end up paying a disability lawyer 25% of your past due benefits.  The amount you pay cannot exceed $6,000.  Because Social Security Disability Attorneys work on a “contingency basis”, claimants are not required to pay anything up front and are only required to pay in the event […]
How Much Does a Disability Lawyer Cost

How Much Does a Disability Lawyer Cost

Usually, if you win your claim, you will end up paying a disability lawyer 25% of your past due benefits.  The amount you pay cannot exceed $6,000.  Because Social Security Disability Attorneys work on a “contingency basis”, claimants are not required to pay anything...

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Will Income from my Spouse Affect My SSDI Benefits?

Will Income from my Spouse Affect My SSDI Benefits?

Will Income from my Spouse Affect My Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits? No. Spousal earnings do not impact SSDI benefits. SSI vs. SSD regarding Spousal Income Your spouse’s income only matters for SSI. There is a difference between SSI and SSD. If you are...

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Social Security Disability and SVP

Social Security Disability and SVP

Specific Vocational Preparation (SVP) is used to define the amount of time
required for a typical employee to learn the techniques, acquire the
information, and develop the facility needed for average performance in a
job. SVP can be acquired in school, the military or at the work place.

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Reddit SSDI Advice: Disability Lawyer Reviews Pros & Cons

Reddit SSDI Advice: Disability Lawyer Reviews Pros & Cons

Can you trust SSDI application & appeal advice on Reddit? That's what we wanted to know. Reddit is by far the most trustworthy mainstream social media platform. However, it's also anonymous and content quality can vary. The SSDI subreddits appear to be high...

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Do I Satisfy the SSA’s Definition of Disability?

Do I Satisfy the SSA’s Definition of Disability?

Unlike other types of disability, there is no partial disability under
either SSD or SSI. You are either 100% disabled or not disabled at all. The
SSA uses a three-prong test in its definition of disability. In order to be
found disabled, it must be determined that as a result of your conditions;

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What’s the Difference Between SSD and SSI?

What’s the Difference Between SSD and SSI?

The History of Disability Under the Social Security Administration The Social Security Act was signed into law by FDR on August 14, 1935. The Act, at that time, provided benefits to retirees, the unemployed, and it provided a lump sum payment at death. Much...

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Frequently Asked Questions

Do I qualify for Social Security disability benefits?

In order to qualify for SSD benefits, you must satisfy both a non-medical and a medical test.

In order to satisfy the non-medical test, you need to have worked in a covered job long enough to accumulate enough work credits.

The second test, the medical test, requires you to have a condition(s) that satisfies the Social Security Administration’s (“SSA”) definition of disability and has lasted or is expected to last at least 12 consecutive months.

Generally speaking, this program will provide you with a monthly benefit in the event that you become unable to work.

What are my chances of winning a disability claim?

The response is always, “It depends.” The table linked here shows the average chance of winning a disability claim at each level of the process.

What are my chances of winning a disability appeal?

There are two types of disability appeals: Appeals Council Repeal and Federal Appeal

Appeals Council Repeal
Claimants are awarded approximately 1% of the time at this level.

An additional 9% of claimants have their case remanded (sent back) to the original ALJ who made the hearing level denial. These remands may be for further development on a particular issue or to correct a procedural error made in the hearing level decision. Generally speaking, judges do not like to have another judge tell them that they made a mistake. Hearing level ALJs will often just re-deny appeals council remands. As a result, having your claim remanded is not always the best result. The goal at this level is often to get denied, which allows a claimant to appeal in federal court.

Federal Appeal

At this level, you are suing the Social Security Administration in Federal Court.  The odds of winning at this level are approximately 2%, which is hardly better than at the Appeals Council.  Federal judges; however, remand (send back) approximately half of these claims for a further evaluation of issues that were improperly considered at the prior hearing.

Do I Qualify for Social Security Disability?

Browse our SSDI resource library to find clear answers and determine if you qualify for up to $3,148/month in SSD benefits.